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Citing Sources  

How to cite sources in different formats
Last Updated: Oct 19, 2012 URL: http://libguides.pratt.edu/citing Print Guide RSS Updates

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Style Guides

The OWL at Purdue is an excellent source for style guides in multiple formats.

   APA in-text citations

   APA reference list

   MLA in-text citations

   MLA works cited

 

MLA Works Cited Examples

Print book with one author:

Walker, Alice. The Color Purple. New

   York: Pocket Books, 1985. Print.

Print book with two authors:

Edison, Thomas, and Nikola Tesla.

   It Was All in Good Fun. Newark:

   Electric Press, 1910. Print.

Print magazine article with one author

Prose, Francine. "The Unblinking

   Judy Linn." Aperture 206 (2012):

   44-47. Print.

Electronic magazine article with one author.

Prose, Francine. "The Unblinking

   Judy Linn." Aperture 206 (2012):

   44-47. Art Full Text (H.W. Wilson).

   Web. 23 Aug. 2012.

Print journal article with one author:

Cartlidge, Neil. "Criseyde's Absent

   Friends." Chaucer Review 44.3

   (2010): 227-245. Print.

Electronic journal article with one author:

Cartlidge, Neil. "Criseyde's Absent

   Friends." Chaucer Review 44.3

   (2010): 227-245. Art Full Text

   (H.W. Wilson). Web. 23 Aug. 2012.

 

Citing Images

When citing images in MLA, it's important to note where the image was found. Citing the original painting is not the same as citing a reproduction in a book. If you went to the Met and saw Rembrandt's self-portrait, it would be cited as:

van Rijn, Rembrandt. Self-Portrait. 1660. Metropolitan

   Museum of Art, New York.

If you saw this same image in your textbook, it would be cited as:

van Rijn, Rembrandt. Self-Portrait. 1660. Metropolitan Museum of Art, New

   York. Gardener's Art Through the Ages. 10th ed. By Richard G. Tansey

   and Fred S. Kleiner. Fort Worth: Harcourt Brace. 939. Print.

If you accessed this same image at the Met Museum's web site, it would be cited as:

van Rijn, Rembrandt. Self-Portrait. 1660. Metropolitan

   Museum of Art, New York. Web. 23 Aug. 2012.

In this case 23 Aug. 2012 is the date you accessed the image. It's not necessary to include the URL of the site, but if your professor requires it, it would just go after the date in brackets <http://metmuseum.org/Collections/search-the-collections/110001847>.

 

MLA In-Text Examples

This style is used in the body of a paper to refer to a source when you have it listed in the bibliography. Note that the number in parentheses is the page where the quotation was found.

Quote attributed to author in the text:

Dickens was not merely whistling Dixie when he observed that "it was the best of times, it was the worst of times" (42).

Quote not attributed to the author in the text:

One author went so far as to proclaim "it was the best of times, it was the worst of times" (Dickens 42).

Paraphrasing or referring to a claim:

Dickens was unsure about whether it was the best of times or the worst of times. He may even have thought it was both (42).

 

Websites in MLA

An article in an online publication:

Grundberg, Andy. "Cindy Sherman - Reviews." Art in America. Brant Publications., 18 Jul. 2012. Web. 23 Aug. 2012.

In this citation, the title of the article is in quotes, the title of the publication is in italics, and the publisher follows the magazine title. The first date is the date the article was created (if known, otherwise use n.d.). The second date is the date the item was accessed.

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