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Women's History Month

Welcome to the Pratt Institute Libraries' Women's History Month guide! First nationally celebrated in 1982 as "Women's History Week," it has gradually evolved into a month-long celebration of women's contributions to history, culture, and society. This annual event creates a space of reflection for often over-looked influential figures in United States history, and looks to the struggles and achievements of women throughout history, both in the United States and around the world, to uplift and celebrate their voices. 

 

 

This guide seeks to commemorate the history of all women, of all races, sexualities, and backgrounds, and to recognize the constant erasure of women with marginalized identities. Womanhood rejects any single representation, and celebrating the contributions of all women in all forms is an important step in shaping a better future. To achieve this, we have curated lists of eBooks, print books, streaming videos, special collection materials and virtual resources and events. We hope you enjoy exploring this guide!

2021 Women's History Month Theme: Valiant Women of the Vote: Refusing to be Silenced

In recognition of the hundred-year-anniversary of the 19th amendment in 2020, the National Women's History Alliance have chosen "Valiant Women of the Vote: Refusing to be Silenced" as the theme of the 2021 Women's History Month. To look at why, you can read their statement below:

2021 Theme The NWHA Women’s History 2021 theme Valiant Women of the Vote: Refusing to be Silenced continues to celebrate the Suffrage Centennial. A victory as important as women winning the right to vote deserves an extended celebration. That’s why the National Women’s History Alliance is leading the drive to celebrate women’s historic achievement throughout 2021. While 2020 was a very challenging year, for the NWHA it was also an amazing year of discovery and partnership. After 40 years of championing women’s history, we were overjoyed to connect with and promote hundreds of amazing suffrage centennial events organized by people and groups at the local, state and national levels. The array of current women’s history organizations and the new research and resources they have been producing is dazzling. There have been many breakthroughs associated with the suffrage centennial because it involved many groups and government bodies throughout the country learning about the importance of women’s history for the very first time. Now, we want to push ahead to secure the progress we’ve made and ensure that multicultural women are never again overlooked in American history.

National Women's History Alliance


However, the fight for women's suffrage didn't end with the passing of the 19th amendment, and so many incredible activists continued to fight for the rights of women who were excluded. Women like Ida B. Wells, Nannie Helen Burroughs and Frances Ellen Watkins Harper were integral to the passing of the amendment, and continued their work in activism long afterwards.

 

Nannie Helen Burroughs, holding a banner reading, "Banner State Woman's National Baptist Convention," stands with eight other African-American women, photographed between 1905 and 1915. Burroughs (1879-1961) was an activist, educator and suffragette who fought for African American and women's rights.

Nannie Helen Burroughs, holding a banner reading, "Banner State Woman's National Baptist Convention," stands with eight other African-American women, photographed between 1905 and 1915. Burroughs (1879-1961) was an activist, educator and suffragette who fought for African American and women's rights. Library of Congress