Annotated Bibliography - MLA StyleAnnotated Bibliography - Chicago Manual of StyleAnnotated Bibliography - APA Style
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Annotated Bibliographies  

Tips and resources about writing annotated bibliographies. This guide is aimed towards research about art and architecture.
Last Updated: Nov 1, 2016 URL: http://libguides.pratt.edu/annotatedbibliographies Print Guide RSS Updates

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Online Citation Help

  • Purdue Online Writing Lab (OWL)
    The Purdue OWL site offers citation examples for a variety of publication types. Additionally, it has sample papers and bibliographies formatted in Chicago Style.
  • Research & Documentation Online, 5th Ed.
    This free site offers extensive examples for in-text, note, footnote and bibliography citations. In addition to the Chicago Manual of Style (CMS), it offers citation help for those using MLA, APA and CSE style guides. The CMS section also has Chicago manuscript formatting tips, a sample research paper & sample bibliography.
 

Published Annotated Bibliographies

In addition to the online examples of annotated bibliographies (see right), there are puplished annotated bibliographies. Here are a few examples from the Pratt Libraries' collection. It might help to take a look at these.

Click on the image or link to view the PrattCat record--this will help you determine a book's location & availability.

 

What Is An Annotated Bibliography?

What is an annotation and a bibiography?

A bibliography is most often created to list the sources that were used in a research paper or presentation. Sometimes bibliographies are assigned as a stand-alone project so that a student will become familiar with works by a particular author or on a particular theme. Bibliographies might list a variety of source-types such as journal articles, books, websites, images, podcasts, etc.

An annotation is a summary or evaluation of a source that helps to establish its scope, relevance and/or usefulness. Annotations are written in paragraph form.

Therefore, an annotated bibliography will list sources with accompanying annotations. Preparing an annotated bibliography can help you learn about a topic, establish the relevance of sources to a topic, formulate a thesis argument, and keep track of the sources used during the research process. Professors often assign an annotated bibliography as one of the steps toward actualizing a research project. 

For more information on annotated bibliographies, check out the following two guides available via Purdue OWL:

 

 

Different Manuals of Style

The three main Manuals of Style used today are:

      1.  American Psychological Association (APA) Style

      2. Modern Language Association (MLA) Style

      3. Chicago Manual of Style

Which style should I use?

The format of your research paper and bibliography will depend on the subject of your research.

To determine which style to use, the Purdue OWL offers a Citation Style Chart that compares and contrasts the three Manuals of Style in detail.

Click Here to view the Citation Style Chart PDF!

*This guide focuses on the MLA Style and Chicago Manual of Style, as it is geared towards art and architecture research documentation.

Get Writing Help

Pratt's Writing and Tutorial Center (WTC) wants to help you become a better research paper writer. Walk-in or make an appointment to get help.

Conversation groups are also avaible for international students!

Contact the WTC

-Location: North Hall on the 1st floor

-Phone (718) 636-3459

-Email: dcohen@pratt.edu

Hours

-Monday to Thursday, 10am-8pm

-Friday 10am-5pm

Get Research Help

Librarians at Pratt want to help you with your research :)  Here's how to contact us: 

  • Chat-w/-A-Librarian
    Chat online with a librarian (Mon-Fri, 9am-5pm).
  • Ask-A-Librarian
    Call, email, or visit our Reference Desk :)

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    Manhattan: (212) 647-7539

    Email: libref@pratt.edu

    Location: The Reference Desk is on the 1st Floor of the Brooklyn Library.
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